Swedish.org   |   Subscribe   |  

Donor Stories

Honoring a son by helping others

It was hard for Karen Bienz to watch Steven deteriorate from an aggressive form of melanoma that eventually took his life at the age of 25. Steven’s cancer story began when his dermatologist removed a “weird-looking” mole from his collarbone. When the pathology report showed it was melanoma, the dermatologist referred Steven to a surgeon to have several lymph nodes removed to check for cancer cells. All of the nodes were cancer free, so Steven went on with his life.
Read More > 

The ultimate gift

Mac Chavarria is a typical baby boomer. He lives life to the fullest … and he’s one of the 2.4 million Americans born between 1945 and 1965 who got hepatitis C. Mac contracted Hep C in the early 1970s. Initially his symptoms sent him to the hospital, but as the years went by the symptoms were no longer active and he pretty much forgot he had Hep C. “My Hep C was dormant and had no symptoms, so my life seemed normal.”
Read More > 

Giving from an abundance of appreciation

As Connie and Dick DelMissier sit in their garden looking out on the Cascade Mountains, they reflect on their life together and appreciate those things that have helped them live through the ups and downs they experienced along the way. While they have had the joy of living their entire lives in Seattle, when it gets right down to it, they enthusiastically credit Swedish for their long life together.
Read More > 

Using a loss to help find a cure

Losing a loved one to ovarian cancer is devastating. To help find a cure is inspirational. That’s how Derek Loeser and his wife, Katie Van Kessel, M.D., have chosen to remember Derek’s mom, Susan, after she passed away from ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is virtually a hidden disease, with symptoms that are easily attributed to other medical conditions. In Susan’s case, her cancer had metastasized by the time it was discovered.
Read More > 

A passion for educating physicians

Sandy Norris, MBA, came to Swedish in 1994 with one goal: build a robust and successful Continuing Medical Education (CME) program. She thought she’d be here three or four years before moving on to a new challenge, instead she stayed for 24 years. She discovered that her passion for education could be fueled through both her day-to-day work and her philanthropic contributions to medical education through the annual employee Caregiver Campaign.
Read More > 

Remembering a love story

Kent Rukke is quick to share that he and his beloved wife Debbie were married 47 years, 6 months and 11 days. Kent may have lost the love of his life to brain cancer, but his memories of their life together are his constant companion, and also the impetus for his philanthropic support of The Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI). In October 2015, Kent and Debbie’s idyllic life was turned upside down.
Read More > 

Heart-healthy cheerleaders for Swedish

Herb Schoenfeld’s life has centered primarily on furniture, healthy living and his faith. Throughout his early years, Herb was a bodybuilder. He thought he was very healthy. You can imagine his surprise, then, when he had a heart attack at the age of 46.
Read More > 

A decades-long commitment to the community

For Sellen Construction, a decades-long record of community involvement defines them as much as their reputation for building the skylines of Seattle does. “The belief that it was important to develop partnerships with the communities in which we had construction projects began when my father Rick led the company,” says Scott Redman, president of Sellen. “As we approach our 75th anniversary, community engagement is now baked into our culture. And, it’s reflected in our corporate philosophy to ‘always do what’s right for our employees, our clients and the community.’”
Read More >